Launch of Young Talent on Screen Film Festival: We want your films!

 

Young Talent on Screen is a film festival organized by, and for children and young people with disabilities, run by a dedicated group who are passionate about film and who want to use their knowledge and skills to plan a festival together.

YToS is launching a call out for short films made by children and young people with disabilities up to 25 years old.  The YToS team will view the films submitted and discuss together which films should be screened and what shape the festival will take. The selected filmmakers will be invited to the festival as guests, attend all screenings for free and have the chance to meet other filmmakers through social events and activities. The Festival will take place in Glasgow in March 2014.

We are looking for all kinds of short films (5 minutes and under) from around the world – it costs nothing to enter and individuals and groups can submit as many films as they like.

Project Ability run several filmmaking workshops throughout the year where the young people produce all kinds of short films. The YToS workshops are different, they are about young people coming together and thinking critically about film. YToS is an extraordinary opportunity for the young people to be involved in every aspect of this creative journey.

‘The young people’s knowledge and passion for film is a prominent part of their personality and we would like to bring out this personality within the identity of the film festival’
-Kate Burton, film tutor.

Please, click here to download an application form, and send it back to us before 10th January 2014 at submissions@project-ability.co.uk

We look forward to seeing your films!

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Jordan Kay and Genevieve Kay-Gourlay

For the first time since the start of our residency programme, we had a collaborative duo working in our studios. Genevieve and Jordan are siblings who have decided to put their family at the centre of their artistic project.

What have you been up to during the residency?
Genevieve: “We have been following on from the family’s on-going research into our history, investigating documents, our mother’s own research and different versions of our family tree from either side of the family.
Jordan was already really interested in family trees, even fictional ones, like the family history of Indiana Jones or the Lion King. My own work has always been intensively research based and likened to case study; being that we were coming from two separate practices, it seemed like the ideal subject matter to use, in terms of the way that I work and the way that Jordan was already working.

There were already bits and pieces of research, quite thorough in some places and very sparse in others, and we used different means of communication with the family in order to fill in the gaps. We used the phone but we preferred using Skype, Jordan in particular prefers it as it is more immediate. We didn’t just record the conversations; we recorded the situation and the device of the computer itself which created a distance and made it feel more removed. There is something quite interesting with this approach and we haven’t stopped recording when the conversation ends, or during miscommunications, or connection problems.

Genealogy and the mapping of family histories is one of the world’s most popular hobbies nowadays…
It is and sometimes without people even realising that they’re doing it. When you join Facebook for example, you want to add your relatives and research individuals that are connected to you in some way. This project is not just a collaboration between two artists, but more a collaboration between two individuals that also happen to be related. Jordan defines himself as a writer, so we’ve had a very interdisciplinary way of working; using different fields and methods as a construct to develop the overall project.

How do you turn this into an art project?
We were following rules in term of structure or information but the conversations we were having are not purely factual, it was about getting a feeling for the character and the individual and getting reacquainted. Dates haven’t played a huge factor in our project either and one of our rules in organising the skype chats was that Jordan wanted to speak to people that we actually know already.

So you didn’t talk with anybody that you hadn’t met before, or hadn’t met for a very long time?
We spoke to somebody that I hadn’t seen for a very long time but Jordan did see her recently when he went to Canada. He also got to meet a couple of other people during his trip but I knew nothing about them. I guess we only talked about people we knew because we don’t have any way of connecting with people we don’t know. We’ve been in touch with people directly or via someone else, but some people are completely off the radar, we wouldn’t even know where to begin to get in touch with them!

Is this going to be something you’re going to continue after the residency?
I think so. We’re going to speak to our Uncle Mike next week and our sister who lives in New Zealand. We’re dependent on people’s schedules and the logistics of that are sometimes problematic. What is important is that the family tree has almost acted like a vehicle for us to have a critical dialogue with one another. The product is not necessarily the most interesting element of what’s been going on; it’s the conversations that occurred because of it that are forming the work itself.

How are you going to collate this information?
We have recorded every single conversation that has occurred every day of the residency. There is currently about six hours of footage, audio or video, for every day that we’ve been here! It’s interesting because the first hurdle we had to overcome was our big sister/little brother relationship and how do we restructure this dynamic. Also we hadn’t been in each other’s company for 3 years, as Jordan’s been studying here and I was in Carlisle so we needed to get to know each other again.

We’ve never had a sister/brother artistic duo as artists in residence before, could you tell us a bit more about how this collaborative working came about?
I have been very interested in my brother’s approach from a very young age. He would watch a film in its entirety with the subtitles on, would pause at every new subtitle and copy down the letters. This was before he had learned to read and write at school. He is basically self-taught literate, through film. I was incredibly fascinated by that, even before I went to art school. So now has been the perfect opportunity and place to collaborate together.

How did the space influence you?
Jordan usually works in quite a small scale, so the space has allowed us to enjoy the scale in a big way! A lot of my work previously has involved video, as has Jordan’s but with the inclusion of text as well, both practices have been quite isolated. To bring our practices into a shared space has made the conversation bigger, which means the work ended up getting bigger.

The project itself is huge in terms of concept too.
It’s never-ending, infinite. At the moment we have discovered family in Argentina, South Africa, Scotland, Germany, New Zealand, Canada and America. It is worldwide and it is infinite in terms of information. On top of that, we began with records that we thought were quite thorough and accurate but we found out that one family member who was disowned might have willingly tampered with them and changed information on purpose. So it is almost a fiction and it would be as important if it was a fictional family tree. It is almost irrelevant whether it is a truth or not as the process is what is at the centre of our project.

A lot of our conversations revolve around films; it is an interest that we share and something that Jordan uses to relate with things in life as a way of processing. It has played a really big part in conversations about being in this space, working with this material. Even in terms of understanding the concept of twins or the idea of the deceased.

How involved have your parents been in the project?
We haven’t had a conversation with them and that has been quite purposeful. We haven’t skyped them on purpose. Our knowledge is based on what they have told us, we were only as informed as other people have allowed us to be. Our mother passed on a lot of her research to her brother’s wife via email, and then lost access to her email account and didn’t keep a copy of it. So our Aunt has a lot of information that obviously our Mum knows about, but doesn’t have in concrete. They did provide things like photographs or birth certificates but we haven’t really spoken to them as part of the recorded project.

Where will you go from here?
Because so much has been archived, we’re going to have to look through it with a bit of distance. We need a bit of an overview and look at it as a whole to understand what’s going on! It will be interesting to see the structure of this as an object, a bi-product of a process.


From Jordan Gourlay Kay

What have you enjoyed about the residency?
It’s family business. I liked writing and the game when we named the films.*

Oblivion, Wreck it Ralf, James Bond, Indiana Jones. Oblivion has Tom Cruise - Mission Impossible, War of the Worlds. I like Meet the Parents – Robert de Niro was in Shark Tale. and Star Trek. Madagascar. The Neverending Story.

What have we done in the studio?
We came on the underground and we walk. We get something to drink. We do work. It’s different. Drawing, activities, family tree stuff. Labels pencil masking tape ruler string paperclips photographs. Skype was good – the people. Made videos working with Ginny.**

Singin in the Rain – moses supposes his toeses are roses

Talk about other things. Music. Films. Greek gods myths and legends. Twins and people pass away.

*game similar to ‘articulate’ where you have to describe a film without saying the title and the other person has to guess what it’s called/the actor in it/the characters’ name.
** Ginny is the family nickname for Genevieve

Jordan and Genevieve will see their work exhibited in the Project Ability Gallery alongside the other artists in residence in January 2014.

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Simon McAuley in Wales - Week 2

Simon McAuley has just started his third week of residency at Celf O Gwmpas in Llandrindod, mid-Wales. He sent us a photo diary for his second week, and by the look of things, he seems to have a great time cycling about town and taking in the wonderful Welsh landscapes.

Sunday 21st july

"Morning in Llandrindod before the sun came out"

"Entrance to Metropole Hotel."

 

Monday 22nd July

"Climbing the hill behind the town."

 

Tuesday 23rd July

"A day spent with my practice support artist (Lois Hopwood). Painting, photographs, coffee and tea, and a walk up a hill, where I made this picture of Lois painting."

 

Saturday 27th July

"A cycle trip which took me through a valley with a nature reserve."

 

Sunday 28th July

"In the town of Llandrindod."

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Bus trip to Jupiter Artland

 

On Thursday 25 July, artists from ReConnect and Aspire had a bus trip to Jupiter Artland.

The sculpture trail is set in beautiful parkland in the outskirts of Edinburgh and despite the inclement weather it was a great day out.

For more information and to find out how to get there, visit http://www.jupiterartland.org/

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Flowers everywhere!

Project Ability helped a host of budding young artists to transform the windows of the Trongate 103 foyer into a vibrant flower garden for the Merchant City Festival

Inspired by the different flowers of the Commonwealth countries and territories the colourful display blossomed and grew over Saturday and Sunday and attracted lots of admiration and attention from passers-by. What a beautiful sight on a drizzly Monday morning!

 

More photos on our Facebook Page.

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Artwork of the Week - ‘Felix by the Ocean’ by Zoe Wagner

It's time for Artwork of the Week and we are very pleased to bring you 'Felix by the Ocean' by Zoe Wagner!

This is a perfect example of how a painting can promote a visionary experience where Felix the cat sits against a hypnotic projection of the sea.

 

Zoe's painting is on show in the gallery as part of Young Talent and we are open Saturday and Sunday this weekend for the Merchant City Festival - don't miss it! 

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New closing date for volunteers applications: Friday 09 August

 

We are looking for an artist with skills in ceramics and an artist with skills in printmaking to support our ‘Aspire’ participants, starting in August for a period of 7 weeks with the possibility of an extension.  Volunteers for these roles should be able to commit between 3 to 5 hours per week.

We are also hoping to recruit six artists for our ‘Create’ Saturday workshop programme.  We have two opportunities from 10 am to 12:30pm to volunteer with our youngest artists aged 5 – 12 years and two opportunities from 1pm to 4pm to support young people aged 12 - 21 years.  We also have a further two opportunities to volunteer with our 21 – 28 year old artists, in our studio provision, ‘Art Matters’ from 4pm – 6pm.   These volunteer positions will run from Saturday 17th August for 8 weeks, with the possibility of extension.

All of these volunteering positions are based at our workshop in Trongate 103.

If you are interested in volunteering in one of these roles please complete the application form and return it to Tracy Gorman at volunteers@project-ability.co.uk

Closing date for applications is Friday 09 August

If you have any queries regarding these positions, please feel free to contact Volunteers Co-ordinator, Tracy Gorman on the above email address.

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Simon McAuley in Wales - Week 1

 

 

Simon McAuley has now been in residency at Celf O Gwmpas in Llandrindod, mid-Wales, for just over a week. The artist has been updating us regularly on his experience via a photo diary. Here's what he has been up to in his first week.

Tuesday 16/07

"A short walk and then met the nice people at Celf o Gwympas."

 

Wednesday 17/07

 

Thursday 18/07

"Towards the end of Elan Valley walk. Temperatures were in the high twenties for most of the day."

"Brewed up a cup of tea with my practise support artist (Lois Hopwood)."

"And to finish the day we did some painting."

 

Friday 19/07

"A day of cycling. Stopped in the shade for a break."

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Merchant City Festival workshops with Project Ability

 

Commonwealth Flower Garden is a drop in event for children and families to create national flowers and plants from around the Commonwealth countries and territories to take away or display in our ‘Commonwealth Garden’ in the window space of the Trongate 103 Foyer.

Create beautiful plants and flowers from across the Commonwealth like the black Orchid of Belize, Canada’s Maple, the red-blossomed heilala of Tonga or Scotland’s very own thistle. A variety of arts and crafts materials will be available to work with on the day and our ‘Commonwealth Garden’ (complete with astro-turf) will bloom and grow throughout the 2 day event.

Dates: Saturday 27th July: 1-2pm & 2:30-3:30pm
             Sunday 28th July: 1-2pm & 2:30-3:30pm
Cost: free

Note: there is no need to book a place, as these workshops are drop-in. However, there are only limited places, and they will be attributed on a first come-first served basis.

For more information, please contact create@project-ability.co.uk or 0141 552 2822.

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Artwork of the Week - Hills by Tommy Mason

We've got that summer feeling! We thought we would match it with a colourful landscape as our Artwork of the Week, 'Hills' by Tommy Mason

 

 

Tommy's enthusiasm for drawing and painting is obvious in his works and also extends to his role of gallery volunteer where he spends his time filling sketchbook upon sketchbook of joyful images of the countryside, the people of the landscape and the beasts you find there.

Tommy and many other artists from Project Ability's Aspire Programme are exhibiting in Platform, The Bridge in August where their collective fervour for colour will be displayed in an ambitious painting installation. 

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Genevieve & Jordan - Residency Half Way Point!

Artists in residence for the month of July are brother and sister artistic duo Genevieve and Jordan Kay-Gourlay. They have been busying themselves in a rigorous investigation of their family history by compiling family trees and filming cross-continent family skype sessions.

 

 

We are very much looking forward to catching up with them towards the end of their residency to find out more of what they have been up to. In the meantime, you can find out more about their activities on their blog.   

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Up-cycling workshop with Marlies

 

On Friday 12 July, ReConnect artist Marlies set up an up-cycling workshop in our studios. Joined by Morag, they used old t-shirts to make bags, scarves, waistcoats, bracelets and necklaces.

 

 

The pair of them had a great time, and made some really nice new pieces out of old things!

 

 

 

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Arthouse Productions visited Project Ability in June

In June 2013, Project Ability was visited by Yvonne DuBourdieu and her son Felix from Canada-based studio Arthouse Productions.

During their visit, they filmed and interviewed some of our artists for a documentary, which will be available to watch online shortly. Max McIlmunn shadowed them and produced this little film about their visit.

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Simon McAuley is starting a three week residency in Wales

 

Simon McAuley has just arrived at Celf O Gwmpas in Llandrindod in mid-Wales, where he will spend the next three weeks as their artist in residence. The artist, who studied photography and whose work often has an allusion to landscape, will for sure be inspired by the scenery and architecture of the rural town. Celf O Gwmpas are providing him with a flat, a studio and a small stipend as well as access to their workshop programme.

Simon will send us regular updates and photos during the residency, which we will then post on the blog weekly. Today is his first day, and we already have two images for his photo diary.

Above: "A picture I made while contemplating the trip to wales and what I will do there."

 

 

16/07: "Lovely weather here in Wales. Nice breeze. Kayte met us at the station and we walked through the very picturesque village."

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Reminder: closing date for volunteer applications is 19 July 2013

 

 

Project Ability has new volunteer opportunities for graduate artists, starting August 2013.

We are looking for an artist with skills in ceramics and an artist with skills in printmaking to support our ‘Aspire’ participants, starting the week commencing 5th August for a period of 7 weeks with the possibility of an extension.  Volunteers for these roles should be able to commit between 3 to 5 hours per week.

We are also hoping to recruit six artists for our ‘Create’ Saturday workshop programme.  We have two opportunities from 10 am to 12:30pm to volunteer with our youngest artists aged 5 – 12 years and two opportunities from 1pm to 4pm to support young people aged 12 - 21 years.  We also have a further two opportunities to volunteer with our 21 – 28 year old artists, in our studio provision, ‘Art Matters’ from 4pm – 6pm.   These volunteer positions will run from Saturday 17th August for 8 weeks, with the possibility of extension.

All of these volunteering positions are based at our workshop in Trongate 103.

If you are interested in volunteering in one of these roles please complete the application form and return it to Tracy Gorman at volunteers@project-ability.co.uk

Closing date for applications is Friday 19 July 2013. Informal Interviews will be held from the week beginning 22nd of July 2013.

If you have any queries regarding these positions, please feel free to contact Volunteers Co-ordinator, Tracy Gorman on the above email address.

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Project Ability Cheer for Andy Murray!

We're all jubilated about the result of this year's Wimbledon Tournament and wanted to share some Project Ability artists' tributes to the man himself from 2012...

Andy Murray, acrylic on paper by John Cocozza

 

 

Andy Murray, drypoint on paper by John McNaught

Congratulations Andy!

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Gerry Smith: Project Ability’s very own sitar player!

 

Gerry Smith became involved with Project Ability through the You, me and ASD exhibition, and since then has been a regular fixture of the Trongate 103 First Thursday events. Every month, Gerry generously gives his time –and talent!- by playing the sitar in our gallery. The beautiful sounds are a perfect accompaniment to the art and enrich the gallery experience. We took the opportunity to ask him a few questions during last week’s event.

How long have you been playing the sitar?
I have been playing for about four years now, on and off. Since I took up piano, I haven’t been playing sitar as much. I bought this sitar on Gumtree, and within a few weeks I saw a poster at Strathclyde Uni, where I was studying, advertising a sitar class. A week after seeing the poster, I was taking my first lesson. It was taught by Haroon Simon, a student, from Pakistan, who is now a good friend. Haroon's father was also a sitar player.

What drew you to this instrument?
I heard it in the 80’s in Camden Market, a stall was selling a couple of sitars, not in very good condition, and this guy was playing it. I desperately wanted to buy one… I was playing the twelve string guitar at the time and always loved that tone effect. There’s something very human about it, there is a rhythm, but it’s not like the four-four you have in Western music. To me that sounds like slaves pulling the oars of a boat… In Indian music you can hear everything in between.

When you are playing, is it something composed or do you just improvise?
I learnt some very basic parts of the Indian rag. It comes from the voice: the voice has quarter tones and notes in between the full tones that other instruments can’t reproduce, and this is how the sitar came about.

 

 

Have you always been into music?
Always.  I’m much more confident with music than I am with other means of communication. I’m not great with reading or words, but I feel comfortable with music.

What other instruments do you play?
I’ve just passed my Grade 3 piano, I might do a Grade 4 this year. I also play guitar, ukulele, and I’m trying to learn the squeeze box. But I wouldn’t bring another instrument here, they could feel quite intrusive in a gallery, not like the sitar. This place is amazing for playing the sitar. This music has a lot to do with imagination. When you hear Debussy’s piano music, you have the same feeling that you get with Eastern music, because he changed his style after hearing Javanese gamelan music at the 1889 Universal Exhibition in Paris. His style was a lot freer after hearing Eastern music.

And on that note, Gerry goes back to the gallery and fills the room with beautiful melodies once more.

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Artist in Residence June 2013 - Lorraine Hamilton

 

Our second artist in residence this year was Lorraine Hamilton, a recent graduate from Glasgow School of Art. Over her month long residency, she experimented with materials and texture, and roused the other artists' curiosity.

A month is quite a short period of time, so how did you prepare for the residency?
I thought I was really well prepared. I had a plan in mind of what I was interested in doing, I wanted to get involved with the classes and get to know everybody… I thought the work would come later and would be a reflection on the experience. Then I got here and it all went out the window. It was a very different environment from what I expected, people work very independently. It’s a bit like being given a gift of a very nice studio: I’ve been given time and space and I could do anything I wanted. It’s been ideal, I finally had time to work on all these ideas that I’ve had for the last few months.

Can you tell us about these ideas, and what you worked on?
The first week I went through all the research I had bookmarked but didn’t have time to properly think about. For instance, materials I like to work with, tactility and to offer an experience to people based on that. For example hair, or sugar – I was trying to grow sugar crystals. Then I started doing a lot of drawing, which I haven’t done in a while, and they were all related to an experience of communication. Through my work with Sense Scotland, working with deaf and blind children or people who have different communication obstacles to overcome, I’ve had to find new ways of communicating. Quite often they are unsuccessful. I’m quite interested in that idea of trying and failing.

We see you are using some ‘Oasis’ and hair, both are materials that can make people a bit uncomfortable…
I love it! Same with the hair: people are really phobic about it. I’m only using cheap hair extensions and people hate touching it. I like the idea of luring people in, they come and want to touch things and then really regret it. Overwhelmingly, people are showing disgust, maybe because hair is such an intimate thing. When it comes from a stranger, it’s revolting. As for the ‘Oasis’, at first I only considered it as something to hold the hair, but I love the feeling of carving it. I find it very pleasant, though people have been coming over and really disliked the feel of it.

Your work looks like a sort of landscape, especially your drawings…
That was my initial idea. I’ve been drawing landscapes made of hair ,which I thought was very beautiful, then I set out to make a sculpture of it. None of it is anywhere near finished, I think it will change quite a lot in the next months but I’ll definitely carry the work on. It feels very indulgent to be able to experiment.

Did you get much interest from the other artists in the workshops?
Yes, it’s been really nice actually. It’s quite casual. People have been showing me their work, chatted about mine… I really enjoyed it. It’s such a nice studio environment. It felt like a real gift.

Can you tell us more about your background?
I graduated in 2011, and I’ve always been interested in sensory and tactile work, though I never really considered working for a charity or with other people before. Then I got in touch with Sense Scotland, initially for research. I enjoyed working with people so much that it changed the way I thought about my own work and my idea of communication itself. I create work that encompasses more than the standard visual and audio aspects, I have worked with materials that provide a scent, or a taste, like caramel or sugar and that bring a broader sensory experience to the viewer.

Thank you Lorraine, we are very much looking forward to seeing your finished work in January 2014 during the residency exhibition.

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Last week of ReConnect workshops

 

This week is the last one of the current ReConnect block of workshops. The next block will start on the 06 August and will run for 10 weeks.

In the meantime, have a look at what some ReConnect artists have been working on!

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Artwork of the Week - Greg Coultas

 

 

In the midst of Young Talent season, we are very pleased to bring you 'Classic Car' by Greg Coultas as our Artwork of the Week!

Greg’s drawings are full of colour, energy and abstract shapes. In this drawing a seemingly biomorphic shape is combined with a form of automatic drawing to make his unique rendering of a classic car.

 

 

Don’t miss the Young Talent exhibition, continues until 28 July

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Meet our gallery invigilators

A few Project Ability artists have been volunteering as gallery invigilators, which allows them to make their own work (they have been given a sketchbook each) while greeting visitors or processing sales. Let's meet the gallery invigilators!

 

Steven Reilly

How long have you volunteered as a gallery invigilator?
One year.

What are your duties?
My duties are making sure that no one steals anything, and to answer people's questions.

What has been your favourite exhibition?
The one with the spider web! (Young Talent)

(Read more about Steven and his work here)

 

Edward Henry

How long have you volunteered as a gallery invigilator?
One year.

What are your duties?
Looking after the gallery and shop.

What was your favourite exhibition?
All of them.

(Read more about Edward and his work here)

 

Mhairi and Mary-Anne Macdonald

How long have you volunteered as a gallery invigilator?
Six months.

What are your duties?
To talk to people who come in and to sell stuff.

What has been your favourite exhibition?
Mary-Anne: The one with the black stuff (Residency exhibition)
Mhairi: The one with the cat (Young Talent), the pottery (George Stevenson Solo Showcase), the black stuff (Residency exhibition)

 

Tommy Mason

How long have you volunteered as a gallery invigilator?
One year.

What are your duties?
Say 'Hello' to people coming in and keep the gallery safe. I like having the time to do my drawings.

What has been your favourite exhibition?
I liked them all! My favourites are the ones with colourful work.

(Read more about Tommy and his work here)

 

Christine Sands

How long have you volunteered as a gallery invigilator?
Six months.

What are your duties?
To meet and greet the public and answer relevant questions. To promote and take note of any sales from the gallery shop and to lead people to safety if required.

What has been your favourite exhibitions?
Young Talent.

Thanks a lot to all our gallery volunteers! 

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Ruth Mutch is one of the finalists in the Create Art for Autism competition

 

Ruth Mutch, one of our very talented artists, has been selected as a finalist in the Create Art for Autism competition! Her piece 'Where's Penguin Wally' is one of the 10 finalists in the 2D category. Out of over 800 entries, that's quite an anchievement!

Fingers crossed, Ruth!

Click here to see the 30 works selected. 

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Join us for First Thursday

 

This Thursday is First Thursday, and the gallery will be open late for the occasion. 

Our vibrant exhibition Young Talent is on, and the very talented Gerry will be back once more to play his sitar! Great art, music and some refreshments, perfect recipe for a great evening!

Thursday 04 July, 6pm-8pm, Trongate 103.

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We are now recruiting Volunteers for our next block of workshops

 

Project Ability has new volunteer opportunities for graduate artists, starting August 2013. 

We are looking for an artist with skills in ceramics and an artist with skills in printmaking to support our ‘Aspire’ participants, starting the week commencing 5th August for a period of 7 weeks with the possibility of an extension.  Volunteers for these roles should be able to commit between 3 to 5 hours per week.

We are also hoping to recruit six artists for our ‘Create’ Saturday workshop programme.  We have two opportunities from 10 am to 12:30pm to volunteer with our youngest artists aged 5 – 12 years and two opportunities from 1pm to 4pm to support young people aged 12 - 21 years.  We also have a further two opportunities to volunteer with our 21 – 28 year old artists, in our studio provision, ‘Art Matters’ from 4pm – 6pm.   These volunteer positions will run from Saturday 17th August for 8 weeks, with the possibility of extension.

All of these volunteering positions are based at our workshop in Trongate 103. 

If you are interested in volunteering in one of these roles please complete the application form and return it to Tracy Gorman at volunteers@project-ability.co.uk

Closing date for applications is Friday 19 July 2013. Informal Interviews will be held from the week beginning 22nd of July 2013.

If you have any queries regarding these positions, please feel free to contact Volunteers Co-ordinator, Tracy Gorman on the above email address.

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