Walking Group - Week 18: Panopticon & Holmwood House

Last week the walking group went to two venues that couldn't be more different. Firstly we went just two doors down and around the corner to the Britannia Panopticon, the oldest surviving music hall in the world.

Inside is a small museum of the history of the venue, featuring posters, programmes, costumes and props. The music hall, in its day, hosted a variety of shows, from comedy to drama and musicals, with many famous acts passing through, notably Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy.

Currently they screen films and host variety shows and music nights as well as being open in the afternoon for free viewings of the displays. The venue features a bar and has merchandise for sale. It is an amazing place simply oozing history, some less savory than wholesome but all interesting and worth a second visit. Find out more at http://www.britanniapanopticon.org/

We then took a bus through the south side of the city to visit Holmwood House. Built in the late 1850's by Alexander 'Greek' Thompson for James Couper and his wife, the house is now owned by the National Trust but has been many families homes before becoming a nunnery.

The Couper family made their money in paper and founded the Couper Institute. The detail in the house is exquisite and no section was build and decorated with less than the main house, meaning the servants quarters, kitchen and coach house are all as fabulous as the main home.

There is a stunning garden and vegetable area. I personally found the serving area in the dining room to be the most stunning feature and was interested to hear that the nuns had used it as their altar during their time at Holmwood. More about the property can be found at http://www.nts.org.uk/Visit/Holmwood-House
-Morag McGilchrist

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Walking Group - Week 17: GMRC

On Wednesday 30th August the walking group went by train to Nitshill to visit the Glasgow Museums Resource Center. The center houses artworks and artifacts that are currently not on display in museums within the city.

It was opened in the early 2000's and expanded when the Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum was being refitted to accommodate more pieces, it currently homes over one million paintings and artifacts and it is simply not possible to see everything in one go.

On this visit we got to see items of social history including home appliances and ceramics. Fascinating were the early TV's, washing machines and even a circular dishwasher. We saw a scale model of Glasgow made post world war two that was to help plan and design the reconstruction of the city after the blitz.

Upstairs we saw ceramics and glassware both functional and decorative from a variety of time periods and places throughout Europe. Personally I enjoyed seeing some of the Glasgow factory tea sets that were familiar to me. More can be found out about the center at http://www.glasgowlife.org.uk/museums/GMRC/Pages/default.aspx Visits can be arranged and also they do tours at set times, but you are not able to just drop in like the cities other museums.
-Morag McGilchrist

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Walking Group - Week 16: Glasgow School of Art

"On Wednesday 23rd August the Walking Group were invited to a tour of the Against Landscape exhibition in the Reid Gallery at the Glasgow School of Art.

We were treated to lovely weather and enjoyed a stroll though the city from Trongate 103 up to GSA, via George Square. Once there we met Caroline Grape who would show us around and talk about the pieces and artists a little. She was very nice and had a lot of information about the work and also how the gallery works.

The GSA students themselves invigilate the gallery between lectures, giving them an experience in another area of the broader field of art. We saw many works in a wide variety of mediums including video installations, photography, paintings and sculpture.

We were also shown how the exhibition had been installed via basic wooden stacking blocks made especially so they could travel and be used to display work anywhere. It was actually the final day of this particular exhibition but the gallery space was fantastic and I would recommend keeping a look out for further exhibits on there, you can check out their website at http://www.gsa.ac.uk/visit-gsa/exhibitions/"
-Morag McGilchrist

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Walking Group - Week 15: Galgael

On Wednesday 17th August the walking group got the opportunity to visit and receive a tour of The GalGael Project in Ibrox. We meet with Dorothy Graham, Programmes Manager, and were immediately treated to a tea or coffee before we even started our tour, a very welcomed idea.

We split into two groups for tours as there was a large group of us that day, and in a fun way to choose who went first we decided those who had hot drinks should stay and finish them! As a tea drinker, I took the second tour. Dorothy explained the history of the project which was started in 1997 by Colin Macleod, a community activist who wanted to build a sense of community after failing to stop the motorway being built. He had family roots in the northern Scottish islands and was interested in sailing and boat building, especially traditional wooden boats.

The project began as a boat building one and grew into other wood crafts, with boat building still at its heart: on our visit no less than three boats were in various stages of completion. Participants learn basic wood cutting and carving skills before going in to build simple items like boxes. Once the basic skills are mastered they can choose to make just about anything, we saw small ornamental items, furniture, musical instruments (including a harp and piano) large scale ornamental pieces and even a spinning wheel.

On the tour we were taken through the workshop and shown the various areas of space available, including some areas rented by professional wood craftsmen who then work alongside the other participants. No prior experience is needed and we were told most people have never worked with wood before they started.

They have an open evening every Thursday and we were invited along if we could make it, it is open to anyone and a meal is served -participants and community members alike attend with family and it sounds like a great social gathering. The project was amazing and I would suggest anyone interested in working with wood take a look at their website which can be found at http://www.galgael.org/
-Morag McGilchrist

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Walking Group -  Week 14: Edinburgh Art Festival

Running alongside the Edinburgh International and Edinburgh Fringe Festivals is the Edinburgh Art Festival, an exciting programme of exhibitions and events across the city.

Our walking group outing last week began with a bus journey to the capital followed by an energetic walk from the bus station to Inverleith House.

The house is set in the grounds of the Botanic Gardens and is currently showing Plant Scenery of the World, a varied exhibition of contemporary and historical works looking at the history of botanical collections and display.

A hike back into the city led to Fruitmarket Gallery to see an exhibition by Brazilian artist Jac Leirner, a wonderful display of works made from everyday materials collected by the artist.

You can see the full Art Festival programme at https://edinburghartfestival.com/
Inverleith House exhibition info at http://www.rbge.org.uk/the-gardens/edinburgh/inverleith-house
and Jac Leirner exhibition at http://www.fruitmarket.co.uk/

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Falkirk bus trip

Last Wednesday around twenty Project Ability artists went on a day trip to Falkirk. We were able to fit in two attractions The Falkirk Wheel and The Kelpies.

We met in the Trongate 103 lobby for a 10am departure and were in Falkirk within an hour. We spent an hour at the wheel, exploring the visitor center which is well equipped with toilets, cafe and shop before having a chance to see the wheel in action.

We watched in awe as a canal barge sailed into the bottom section and was amazingly lifted to the top as the mechanism did its magic. In return another barge was brought down and its passengers able to disembark.

At this stage some of the group split up to walk along the canal bank through Falkirk to the Helix Park where the Kelpies are located. The rest of went back to the bus after taking numerous fabulous photographs.

We drove for around ten minutes to the next location and got our first glimpses of the huge metal sculptures from the bus. Once at The Helix we were able to walk down to the statues and see all around them, even getting close enough to see the inside through the gaps in the metal.

There too is a visitor center with information on the construction of the work, a gift shop, more toilets and choice of cafes to eat at. The Kelpies are depicted here as two large horses heads but mythical creatures are shape shifting and can take other forms, horses were chosen for this piece to represent the heavy horses that worked on the canals in history pulling barges.

We ate our lunch in the large, comfortable picnic area and it was then that the rain decided to prove to us it had indeed been forecast, a small shower had everyone pulling out coats, umbrellas and heading towards the visitors center for shelter. Once the rain was past and we had reunited with the walkers we returned to Glasgow and were back by mid afternoon.

For more information on these attractions please visit: https://www.scottishcanals.co.uk/falkirk-wheel/  and  http://www.thehelix.co.uk/

(Blog by Morag McGilchrist)

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Walking Group - Week 10: Pollok Park

What a wonderful day for a walk in the park and what a wonderful park to walk in. Pollok Park in the Southside of Glasgow is not only the biggest park in the city but one of the most beautiful – especially on a sunny day. Our walking group were very pleased to get one of these last week for their trip and thoroughly enjoyed the sunshine. The Burrell Collection museum is currently closed for refurbishment but there is still plenty to do and see in the park.

There was wildlife aplenty with ducks, damselflies, newts and bees being spotted and lots of birdsong heard from the trees above. The group also had the great pleasure of seeing the shire horses grazing in the field and then being led along the riverbank.

It wasn’t the first time the group had been to the park but it was their first time to find the carved dinosaur bones in one of the cultivated garden areas.

For more information about the park visit  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pollok_Country_Park

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Walking Group - Week 9: Hidden Gardens

On Wednesday 17th May the walking group visited The Hidden Gardens located at the back of the Tramway museum.

We split into two groups for a 45 minute tour of the garden area, walking through traditional, woodland and raised bed areas. Our 'vouluntour' leader was Lisa, and she told us the history of the building that had been there before the museum and gardens.

It started life as a plant nursery before being home to a stone masonry, and then a tram depot which was also where the trams were constructed. The gardens still feature a large chimney from these factory days.

Before it became the arts venue it is today, it was the first location of the Glasgow Transport museum. The gardens feature several distinct areas including a lawn area where events, picnics and weekly tai chi classes take place.

The woodland area hosts the xylotheque, a wooden gazebo-like structure that is home to books, each made from wood featuring an inlaid panel and the name of the tree engraved on the corresponding page.

There is a nature area with houses for birds, bees and many other creatures as well as a mint border and herb beds. There is the opportunity to buy plants and also a wishing tree where you are able to write on a small biodegradable card and hang it from the tree.

The gardens are beautiful and peaceful, with many nooks and crannies tucked away so visitors can have a private spot to relax or work in peace. Popular with families there is a host of events taking place year round, check out thehiddengardens.org.uk for more details.
-Morag McGilchrist

The Walking Group is supported by Tesco Bags of Help

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Project Ability bags £4200 from carrier bag charge fund

We are delighted to announce that we have bagged £4200 from a Tesco funding scheme!

Tesco teamed up with Groundwork to launch its Bags of Help funding initiative, which sees grants of up to £5,000, £2,000 and £1,000 – all raised from the 5p bag levy – being awarded to thousands of  local community projects every year. greenspace scotland is working with Groundwork to provide support to communities in Scotland. Millions of shoppers voted in stores up and down the country. And it can now be revealed Project Ability has been awarded £4200 to keep our Walking Group going for another year!

“Funding from the Tesco Bags of Help scheme will help people with disabilities who take part in our visual art studio to enjoy a years’ programme of safe walks and visits to places of cultural importance in and around Glasgow.” Said Elisabeth Gibson, Executive Artistic Director.

Tony McElroy, Tesco’s Head of Communications in Scotland, said: “Bags of Help has been a fantastic success. We’ve been overwhelmed by the response from our customers. The great thing about Bags of Help is that local people are invited to decide how the money will be spent in their community. We can’t wait to see the projects come to life.”

Voting ran in stores throughout February with customers choosing which local project they would like to get the top award using a token given to them at the check-out. Since launching in 2015, Bags of Help has awarded more than £28.5 million across more than 4,000 local projects.

To find out more about Bags of Help, visit www.tesco.com/bagsofhelp

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Walking Group - Week 8: Radical Craft

West Kilbride is Scotland’s first accredited craft town and The Barony Centre is the jewel in its crown.

The current exhibition, ‘Radical Craft’, was co-curated by Laura Hamilton, one of Project Ability’s board members, so the walking group took a trip by train to have a look.

You will see in the photographs that it is a wonderful and varied show with a fascinating range of materials and methods used in the making of the images and objects.

The group spent a long time looking at the exhibition with some guidance and information from Laura before cups of tea and a walk through the village.

There were several artist studios and shops along the way, most of which were unfortunately closed for the day, but a basket-making workshop was open and the group popped in there to have a look around and make a purchase.

This wonderful exhibition runs until 11th June so there is still some time to visit. You can find more information at http://www.crafttownscotland.org/forthcoming-exhibitions-2017/

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Walking Group -Week 7: Alexandra Park

The name Glasgow is derived from the Gaelic word 'Glaschu' which means 'green hollow' or 'dear green place'. The name is still a very appropriate one as there are more than 100 parks and green spaces scattered across the city.

One of the favourites of these is Alexandra Park to the east of the city in the easily accessible district of Dennistoun. Our walking group travelled there on a 38 bus and enjoyed a good leg-stretching walk. For most of the group it was their first visit to the park but for one person it brought back some early memories as her parents had lived next to the park and she had been their several times as a child. She remarked that it 'seemed much bigger then'.

There was a great deal of wildlife activity around the pond with squirrels, crows, pigeons, swans and many other water fowl so it was a bit of a nature lover's paradise with many photo opportunities.

After the tour of the park, many of the walkers went their separate ways but a couple of people carried on walking. The next stop was a visit to a little known statue of Buffalo Bill in the grounds of some flats on Whitehill Street. The sculpture is a bit of a mystery as several web searches have not revealed the name of the artist who made it, so if anyone knows, please tell us!

Finally, an impromtu visit to Market Galley on Duke Street to see 'The Minch' reveals a series of fascinating interactive installations by Suzanne Déry and Susannah Stark before a walk back into town.

You can find more info about Alexandra Park here  and 'The Minch' and Market Gallery here 

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Walking Group - Week 6: WASPS

The walking group doesn’t just give participants the opportunity to get out and about for a walk, it also opens doors to many interesting places and gives the group the chance to meet a range of talented people.

For last week’s outing, a visit to Wasps Studios in Hanson Street was organised to meet some of the artists that work in the ceramics and glass studios.

First was Glasgow Ceramics Studios to meet with Nicola Henderson who was previously an artist in residence at Project Ability. Nicola gave the group a short tour of the studios and then a look at some of the pieces she has been working on.

The group then popped in next door to Glasgow Glass Studio for another short tour and some chat with glass artists Fiona and Brian. It was a fascinating and informative afternoon.

For more information about the studios visit: www.glasgowceramicstudio.com and www.glasgowglassstudio.co.uk

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Walking Group - Week 5: Tramway

It’s been a while since our walking group has ventured south of the river so a visit to Tramway in Pollokshields was something to look forward to.

The walk from the city centre is a good leg stretcher with plenty of interest along the way. Tramway had three exhibitions to entertain the group; a video by Berlin based Oliver Laric, some large scale sculptures by Claire Barclay and a group show by the Tramway over 55s art group.

There was also time for a turn round the Hidden Gardens for those that felt like more walking before getting the bus back into town.

You can find out what’s on in Tramway on their website: http://www.tramway.org

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Walking Group - Week 4: Milngavie

It seems that Milngavie is one of our walking group’s favourite destinations as they made another return visit there last week. One of the regular walkers lives there so he has good local knowledge of the best places to go for a dander.

First stop was Tannoch Loch, a small body of water with a broad range of waterfowl that came to the water’s edge to greet the group and be photographed.

One of the great attractions to Milngavie is the Lillie Gallery. The group have been to several exhibitions there and it has yet to disappoint. An exhibition of portraits of Scottish writers by photographer Angela Catlin filled the walls of the main gallery and in the two smaller galleries there were some paintings from the Lillie collection and a group show of work by artists from Dunoon. This last show was the main attraction for the group as one of our Project Ability tutors, Sandi Kiehlmann, was showing some of her latest textile pieces.

You can find out more about Lillie Gallery by clicking here.

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Walking Group - Week 3: The Lighthouse

"For anyone who has yet to visit The Lighthouse on Mitchell Lane, now is a good time to go as the place is heaving with interesting exhibitions. Mind you, even without the exhibitions it’s a great place to visit as from the top of the building there are wonderful views across the city in every direction.

On the day that our group visited, the lift to the indoor viewing platform was out of order so they bravely took the tower staircase up to the outdoor one. It’s quite a tiring climb but the views from the top make it more than worth the effort.

After some time in the Lighthouse looking at the views and the exhibitions the group took a walk across to the nearby St Enoch Centre to have a look in The Unexpected Artist.

This is a relatively new shop which houses an exhibition space and a couple of areas for resident artists to work in. The group were welcomed by one of the artists who carried on working on his painting while the group had a look around.

A fine day for views and viewings."

You can find out more about The Lighthouse here and even take a virtual tour of some parts of the building.

More information about the Unexpected Artist can be found here.
 

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Walking Group - Week 2: Glasgow

Our walking group didn't stray too far from home last week with visits to some nearby arts venues.

First stop was The Briggait, a magnificent historic building next to the river Clyde and headquarters of Wasps studios. The building was Glasgow's fish market for over 100 years and after a short spell as a shopping centre in the early 1980s, it lay empty before it was converted to artist's studios and exhibition spaces.

The next stop was another historic building; The Gallery of Modern Art.

This building was originally built as a townhouse for a wealthy tobacco merchant and slave trader before spending time as a bank, a library and then it's current function as home to much of Glasgow's collection of modern art and visiting exhibitions of contemporary art from across the world. It is perhaps most famous now for the statue of the Duke of Wellington that stands outside its entrance and often sporting some iconic headgear.

Click here to find out more about the Briggait, and here to read more about The Gallery of Modern Art.

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Walking Group - Week 1: Edinburgh

"Our walking group got off to a fine start to the year with a trip to Edinburgh to see some exhibitions.

First stop was the National Portrait Gallery to see the BP Portrait Awards. This annual exhibition is made up of a selection of submissions from across the world and is always good for at least one ‘my goodness is that really a painting?’ moment. There was also a lovely show of landscape photography.

Next was The Fruitmarket Gallery for a show of paintings, objects and video work by South African artists William Kentridge and Vivienne Koorland.

Finally a visit to Dovecot where the staff had kindly organised a space for the group to have their packed lunches before a visit to the gallery to see ‘Colour & Light’, an exhibition of textile works. Dovecot Rug Tufter Kristi Vana was on hand to treat the group to a demonstration of colour mixing with wool which was both fun and enlightening."

We look forward to seeing much more from the walking group throughout 2017! 

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Walking Group - Week 22: Milngavie

Photo by Alan

The Lillie Gallery in Milngavie is a popular spot with our walking group and they have visited several times before and always received a warm welcome. On this occasion they were met by James, the gallery manager, who gave an introduction to the current exhibition of works by Joan Eardley.

Photo by Doalty

Before visiting the gallery, the group went for a short walk through the village and then along a pathway by the Allander Water.

Alongside the Joan Eardley exhibition, the Lillie currently have their Christmas show which is a mix of paintings, prints and craft pieces.

Photo by Julie

Photo by Julie

Click here to find out more information about these exhibitions.

Photo by Simon

Photo by Simon

Photo by Simon

Photo by Doalty

Photo by Doalty

Photo by Alan

Photo by William

Photo by William

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Walking Group - Week 21: Glasgow Museums Resource Centre

Photo by Stuart

The bus journey to the Glasgow Museums Resource Centre (GMRC) was long and winding and our group was a little late in arriving but they were greeted by a smiling Joanna who was to be the tour guide for our visit.

Only 2% of Glasgow's collection of over one million objects is on show at any given time and the GMRC houses all the pieces that are not currently on display either in Glasgow or on loan to other galleries and museums throughout the world. There are more than 3000 paintings in storage there and it was this particular area of the collections that this visit focused on.

Photo by Stuart

Joanna had selected a few pieces to show the group to start the tour, including the oldest painting in the collection, a portrait of Saint Laurence which dates back 400 years. The group were then invited to request pieces by particular artists that they would like to see. It was a fascinating tour which left everyone wanting to see more.

Photo by Scott

Photo by Scott

The GMRC is open to visitors for tours at 2:30pm each day apart from Mondays. All tours must be booked in advance. For further information click here

There is also an online resource where you can look at images and read information about many of the pieces in the collections here

Photo by Simon

Photo by Simon

Photo by Dennis

Photo by Dennis

Photo by Morag

Photo by Morag

Photo by Celine

Photo by Celine

Photo by Alan 

Photo by Alan

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Walking Group - Week 20: Stirling University

Photo by Celine

Stirling University is located several miles outside the city and is set in beautiful grounds with views to the Wallace Monument, Stirling Castle and Dumyat Hill. On the day our walking group went to visit there was a sprinkling of snow on the hills and the trees were displaying their full autumnal colours.

Photo by Stuart

Photo by Stuart

Photo by Simon

As well as a wonderful location, the university has a fabulous art collection which is on display throughout the corridors of Pathfoot building. One of the first pieces the group saw on entering the building was a painting made by Project Ability tutor Sharon Quigley whose work we went to see in Bellahouston Park on our last outing. As well as the more long term displays of works by Scottish luminaries such as Alasdair Gray, JD Fergusson and Norman McLaren there are areas put aside for shorter term exhibitions and our group found a small exhibition by Artlink and Reachout With Art In Mind along with a show of photographic works by Calum Colvin that included a couple of stereoscopic pieces to be viewed through 3d spectacles.

Photo by Scott

Photo by Scott

Photo by Alan S

Photo by Alan S

After a visit to the cafeteria the group went for a further walk in the grounds before returning to the city and catching the bus home.

Photo by Alan

Photo by Cameron

Photo by Alan

Photo by Cameron

You can find information about the art collection on their website here

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Walking Group - Week 19: Bellahouston Park

Photo by Simon

Our walking group have visited Bellahouston Park a couple of times before, but each time they have been very unlucky with the weather and had to take cover inside. This time however, the weather was glorious so they were able to have a good look around and see parts of the park that they had missed before.

Photo by Celine

Photo by Alan

The main reason for their visit on this occasion was to see an exhibition of paintings by artist (and Project Ability tutor) Sharon Quigley in the Pavillion Gallery. Everyone was agreed that it was a beautiful exhibition.

Other highlights of the day were the maze, the Victorian walled garden and the sunken garden.

Sharon's exhibition runs until 4 December. Click here for more details.

Photo by Alan

Photo by Alan

Photo by Alan

Photo by Alan

Photo by Celine

Photo by Celine

Photo by Morag

Photo by Morag

Photo by Morag

Photo by Morag

Photo by Simon

Photo by Simon

Photo by Simon

Photo by Stuart

Photo by Stuart

Photo by Stuart

Photo by Stuart

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Walking Group - Week 18: Kelvingrove Art Gallery & Museum

Photo by Simon

For many people in Glasgow, Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum is like an old friend. It has many familiar exhibits and everyone has their own favourite items that they like to visit.

Our walking group visit there last week was to see a newly opened room - Life in the Rainforest - where some of the sights and sounds from the South American jungles can be experienced.

As the weather outside was pleasant, the group then took a walk through Kelvingrove Park and up to Park Circus to visit another gallery, The Common Guild, to see the Sharon Hayes exhibition 'In My Little Corner of the World Anyone Would Love You'.

Following this, another walk back through the park took the group to the newly refurbished Kelvinhall, which now holds and displays some of the collections from Glasgow Museums, The University of Glasgow and National Library of Scotland.

You can find out more about these places on the following websites: Glasgow Museums - Life in the Rainforest ; The Common Guild; Kelvinhall

Photo by Heather

Photo by Heather

Photo by Heather

Photo by Heather

Photo by Morag

Photo by Morag

Photo by Morag

Photo by Simon

Photo by Simon

Photo by Stuart

Photo by Stuart

Photo by Stuart

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Walking Group - Week 17: Edinburgh

It had been a while since our walking group had a trip across to Edinburgh for a wander and as there were some great exhibitions about to end, last week seemed like a good time to put that right.

The group had a short list of three galleries to visit, but managed to squeeze in a couple more before deciding their legs had worked hard enough and it was time to relax on the coach back to Glasgow.

The galleries we visited were: Scottish National Portrait Gallery; The Fruitmarket Gallery; Stills; Talbot Rice Gallery; Dovecot Gallery

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Walking Group - Week 16: Auchinlea Park

There are many hidden gems waiting to be discovered in and around Glasgow, and one of these is tucked away in an area of parkland just a few minutes walk from the bustling Fort shopping centre in Easterhouse.

Provan Hall is a 15th century house set in beautiful gardens within Auchenlea Park.

The house is open to the public and is said to be haunted but our group visit went without any spooky sightings.

You can find lots of historical information about Provan Hall here.

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Walking Group - Week 15: Linn Park

Linn Park on the south side of Glasgow was the destination for our walking group last week. The park is one of the largest in the city, second only to Pollok Park, and has many interesting features.

The group started off with a visit the oldest part of the adjacent cemetery. Over the past couple of months there have been visits to several of the city's cemeteries and this one proved to be one of the most interesting and atmospheric.

The signals of autumn were already making themselves seen, with colours of red and russet making an appearance on some of the trees, and the paths adorned in their first layer of fallen leaves.

There is lots of historic and current information about the park on this website.

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Walking Group - Week 14: Glasgow Necropolis

The origin of the word necropolis is from the Ancient Greek language and literally means ‘city of the dead’. Our walking group visited the Glasgow Necropolis last week and found it to be very lively. It was a glorious sunny day and the terraces were alive with tourists and locals alike, enjoying a stroll in the historic surroundings.

The views across the city are spectacular and many of the tombs are beautifully sculpted and carved with interesting information. One of our walkers investigated Wikipedia and found a fascinating page that interpreted the symbols used on headstones which added a great deal of interest to the walk.

On the way up the High Street, the group called in to Civic Room, a gallery that was previously one of the Linen Banks that used to be found around the city. There they met MollyMae, one of the artists whose work was on display in an exhibition called Boundings.

On the way back to base, a couple of the walkers took a small diversion into another cemetery, this one to the rear of the old Ramshorn Kirk on Ingram Street.

You can find more information about Glasgow Necropolis here, Ramshorn Cemetery here and the Civic Room exhibition here

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Walking Group - Week 12: Pollok Park

'Another beautiful day for our walking group when they took a trip to Pollok Park.

The plan was to visit the Burrell museum but it was much too nice a day to be indoors so instead they had a walk in the park making a visit to the Pollok beech tree, the wildlife garden and a stroll along the banks if the river Cart.'

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Walking Group - Week 11: Rouken Glen

It was one of those beautiful sunny days last week when our walking group travelled south to explore Rouken Glen Park.

It was perfect weather for ice cream and an ideal day for spending time in the more shady, wooded areas of the park.

The walled garden was a joy to explore as well but the sunshine was too much for some, so after some time admiring the plants the group headed back into the glen to cool down.

You can find out more about the park and how to get there on their website.

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Walking Group - Week 10: Fairfield Heritage Centre

Our walking group took a trip to Govan last week to visit the Fairfield Heritage Centre. Set in the recently restored Fairfield Shipbuilding Offices, the museum holds a collection of interesting pieces that pay tribute to the history of shipbuilding on the Clyde.

The group, who were given a guided tour by a very helpful woman called Flora, were also lucky to catch the display of proposed designs for a sculpture of Mary Barbour. Barbour, a political activist, was a resident of Govan and the main organiser of the women of Govan who took part in the rent strikes of 1915.

After the tour, the group walked back towards the city centre, some taking the bus part of the way and the others walking all the way along the Clydeside in the splendid sunshine.

Fairfield Heritage Centre is open Monday to Friday, between 1pm and 4pm.

For more information visit http://www.fairfieldgovan.co.uk/heritage/

 

 

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A Marathon Canal Walk

On Sunday 22nd May, a group of walkers walked an entire marathon (26.2 miles) to raise funds for Project Ability. The group included Project Ability board member Bevis Evans-Teush and ReConnect tutor Celine Mcilmunn. Their route took them along the Union Canal and Forth and Clyde Canal footpaths, all the way from from Polmont to Glasgow.

They have raised a fantastic £272 so far, and there is still time to donate by visiting https://localgiving.org/fundraising/projectabilitymarathoncanalwalk

All donations will go to Project Ability, so dig deep! 

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