Dylan Lombard

The World Through My Eyes

16 October – 13 November*

Open Wed – Sat, 11am – 5pm
Project Ability Gallery, Trongate 103
Free entry

Wheelchair accessible with accessible toilet

*please note the gallery will be closed during the weekdays for COP26 from November 1-5 & 8-12*

 

Photographer Dylan Lombard creates drama out of daily life with clever use of shadow and light.

Inspired by street scenes shot by Glasgow photographers Colin Templeton and Oscar Mazaroli, Dylan likes to capture ordinary Glasgow sights and characters:

“I like to do street photography and candid photography, take photographs of places near where I live, places that I know. I am very patient. I stand and wait for someone to go past. I like to think that I can make the ordinary seem more interesting. I like to take photographs of one person. Because I think it highlights how I can sometimes feel alone and insignificant. In a photograph, that person looks small, when framed by the huge surroundings.”

Dylan is attracted to shadows, shapes, lines, colours and angles – using these elements to create art out of the everyday, and to share his perspective on the world with others.


The above film was generously made by Joey Lyttle at online@thedigitalwalkthrough.com.

An exciting new way to view the exhibition!

 


We asked Dylan a few questions about his photographic practice and how he first became interested in the camera, and taking pictures…..

I first became interested in photography in my first year at high school, I started taking photographs on my phone. I used to talk to a teacher in the morning, and show him the photographs that I had taken. This teacher, Mr McClure was also involved in running the school magazine. I didn’t really talk to many people, but he encouraged me to come along to the magazine meetings and appointed me, the magazine photographer. This gave me confidence in my photography, encouraged me to take more photos, that would be included in the school magazine. It was amazing to see my photographs in print and knowing that other people were seeing them too.

My mum got me a second hand camera, a canon, for my 15th birthday. I used to like taking photographs on my phone because it was instant. I was a bit nervous with a proper camera at first. But I started experimenting with the different settings and I found that once I understood it, this could be a lot more interesting, and a more creative way to take photos. I was then allowed to do the Higher Photography course at High School. I say allowed as at the start of fifth year I didn’t have any National 5s and you usually need these to do a higher. Mrs McCaulay thought it would be a good course for me and it  was. I learnt so much and ended up getting a B. I was so proud of myself.

I enjoy taking photographs, because it clears my mind. I like going out by myself on my scooter, taking photographs of things that I see. I like to show my way of seeing the world. So other people see this way of seeing too. I like to do street photography and candid photography, take photographs of places near where I live, places that I know. I am very patient. I stand and wait for someone to go past. I like to think that I can make the ordinary seem more interesting. I like to take photographs of one person. Because I think it highlights how I can sometimes feel alone and insignificant. In a photograph, that person looks small, when framed by the huge surroundings. But that person is also important. They make that picture more interesting to look at.

Looking back, I now see that I started taking photographs as a way to take my mind off things; a coping mechanism. Taking photographs is like a switch that turns off the rest of the world. I am in that silent moment and everything else evaporates.  By taking a photograph I can freeze time and give myself space to think and breathe. I like to spend time gazing at the moments I have captured. Jumping into that image I immerse myself and I float above the world. I realised very quickly that because I see the world with a different perspective because of my autism, I can represent this different way of seeing in my photographs. One way I like to take photographs is to go to the same place repeatedly. Even though it is the same place, the photographs I take are all different; I take them with different eyes.Glasgow is where I live. It is my city. I like to travel around it, on foot, on my electric scooter and on the bus. There are parts of Glasgow that are important to me that I like to take photographs of. 

I’m inspired by the photographer’s Colin Templeton and Oscar Mazaroli  who both take photographs of Glasgow. Their photographs, are not of the big touristy areas that everyone knows but of the ordinary Glasgow, they see the beauty in the ordinary. Both also take photos in black and white. Templeton, in particular, often focuses on a splash of colour in an otherwise dismal scene.

I am currently at Glasgow City college doing the NQ course and hope to move onto the HND next year. I’m working on a few projects with college: taking photos of the alphabet, as seen in everyday objects. Also, I have to focus on the colour, turquoise and take photographs when I see that colour. At first I thought that would be hard but I am enjoying the challenge. Outside of college I am experimenting with shadows and light.

I would like to make a book of my work. And I’m also thinking about making a calendar. I’ve shown my work in Glasgow. I like sharing my work on Instagram as people can see it all around the world. I have made many friends on the internet who like and comment on my work and help me to become better. A local photographer took me to the park to help me with my technique. It was really useful to get a lesson from a professional (Andrew Cawley) and he follows me on Instagram and tells me which of my photos he thinks are really good and where I have a good technique. I’d also like to show my work in other places in the UK. I also would like to go and take photographs and show my work in London. I am going to Iceland soon and hope to take some pictures of the Northern Lights.

Photography has helped me to show people how I see the world. When I look through a lens everything else stops, and it helps close my mind always looking for things that capture my eye and things that look interesting like shadows, shapes, lines, colours and angles.

I am constantly amazed and grateful for the amount of people who engage with my work and the support I have had from the community who share my work and also have it in their businesses:

Little Ho An, Brawsome Bagels, Café Strange Brew, Piatto, Nicholls


View the show and the photographs in this slide show gallery….


If you would like any more information about the exhibition please contact us: exhibitions@project-ability.co.uk

You can follow Dylan’s practice by following him on Instagram:

@be_yourself_dylan

 


*due to potential disruption from COP26, Project Ability has taken the decision to close the gallery during the weekdays for COP26. We will still be open on the Saturdays, and by appointment during this time. COP26 runs from 31 October to 12 November We apologise for any inconvenience. Please email for further information or to make appointments during this time: exhibitions@project-ability.co.uk